News

Joint Press Statement - Death Penalty To Child Rapists

Posted on 07 January 2003
 

Proposed Mandatory Death Penalty for Child Rapists Not in the Child's Best Interest

Kenyataan Bersama - Cadangan Hukuman Mati Mandatori terhadap Perogol Kanak-kanak bukan untuk kepentingan utama kanak-kanak

The undersigned organisations working on sexual assault, rape, child sexual abuse, violence against women and human rights urge the government to reconsider its proposal for mandatory death penalty of child rapists.

Although we are greatly outraged and appalled by the action of the child rapist, it is our greater concern for the welfare of the survivor which underpins our stand. We recognise that the government has a duty to protect women and children from rape and to bring the perpetrators to justice. However, we believe that the imposition of the mandatory death penalty will not solve the problem of the high rate of rape and incest, and in fact may very possibly work to the disadvantage of the survivors in terms of reporting and recovering from the trauma.

 

Mandatory death penalty could decrease the number of reportings of incidences of child rape
Most on-going incidents of child rape and sexual abuse is not disclosed. This is due to its dynamics, which more often than not involves the rapists being in a position of trust and power over the child survivor. In 2001, there were 161 reported cases of child rape, out of which 83% were committed by people they knew (source: Federal Police statistics). This includes siblings, guardians, fathers, stepfathers, teachers, neighbours, adoptive family and relatives.

The child survivor is then placed in a difficult position for attacking the credibility of a trusted adult. In our experience, it is not uncommon to find the adult guardian of the child disbelieving her word. Treated this way, reported or investigated cases of child rape or sexual abuse then become the exception and not the norm. Discovery of such cases is generally because of overwhelming family conflict or incidental discovery by a third party.

Given the gravity of the death penalty, this will further deter the child survivor and those around her from reporting. The child rapist could use this information to threaten or manipulate the child into silence. Making a child responsible for the possible death of someone who is in a position of trust and loyalty over her is grossly unfair to her welfare and impedes her recovery process by further traumatising her. Studies have shown that if the child were aware of the possibility of the perpetrator being put to death as a punishment, the effect on her would be terrifying. Coupled with the feeling of self-blame and guilt that the child would be experiencing, this puts immense emotional burden on the child to report or to heal from the rape.

The child is then forced to continue to remain in the dangerous situation without recourse and more child rapists would continue in their heinous actions without fear of incrimination.

The death penalty for child rape is counter-productive, and does not serve true justice for the survivors.

 

Problems of Conviction and the Need for Support
According to All Women's Action Society's (AWAM) 1999 Rape Research, only about 20% of rape cases reported were charged in court in the Federal Territory, out of which only half end up in conviction. There are many obstacles to conviction including the need for physical injuries to corroborate evidence and the lengthy trial process that is not sensitive to needs of the survivors. Also, the harsher the punishment, the greater the burden of proof placed on the victim and the prosecutor, which makes it more difficult for the rape to be proven. This means there is less chance of conviction at any level. The taboo surrounding rape and tendency of blame to be placed on survivors also make it difficult for reporting.

Instead of focusing on harsher punishment, these issues need to be resolved to enable a safer environment for survivors of rape to disclose, ensuring the conviction of rapists and a non-traumatic criminal justice process which is prompt and effective. Malaysia ratified the Convention on the Rights of Children in 1995, which states that actions taken for the survival, development, protection and participation of the child will have to be in the best interest of children. Reacting to this matter through excessively punitive punishment is not working towards the best interest of the child.

 

Mandatory death penalty is against the fundamental right to life
The death penalty is the grossest violation of the fundamental right to life and the right not to be subjected to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment, as stated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It reinforces the culture of violence and does not tackle the root causes of child rape and violence against women and girls. In addition, studies worldwide have shown that the death penalty is more likely to be imposed on those who are poorer and less educated, or have little recourse to defence. The death penalty is irrevocable under court, yet there is always a risk of miscarriage of justice.

There is also no conclusive evidence to show that the death penalty acts more as a deterrent than any other forms of punishment. Murder and drug dealing are still significant problems in this country despite the mandatory death punishment provided for both forms of crime. The death penalty is based on feelings of vengeance and anger, and when examined thoroughly in the case of child rape, does not affect justice to society or the survivor.

We urge the government to seriously reconsider the death penalty as the effectual solution to child rape, and instead focus on providing real justice to the survivor by ensuring effective prosecution that results in conviction of the perpetrators. This will entail the provision of support services that facilitate reporting by the victim, efficient investigation and gathering of evidence, effective and speedy prosecution as well as ensuring better support services for the survivor to recover from the trauma.

 

The survivors of child rape deserve real justice and protection; the death penalty is not the solution.

Prepared by Jaclyn Kee, Women's Aid Organisation (WAO), endorsed by:
Sisters In Islam (SIS)
International Women's Rights Watch - Asia Pacific (IWRAW AP)
Protect and Save The Children Association of Selangor and Kuala Lumpur (PS The Children)
Women's Centre for Change (WCC)
Women's Development Collective (WDC)
Women's Candidacy Initiative (WCI)
Suara Rakyat Malaysia (SUARAM)
National Human Rights Society (HAKAM)
Amnesty International in Malaysia (AI)
All Women's Action Society (AWAM)
Asiaworks Foundation
Association of Registered Child Care Providers Malaysia (PPBM)
Association of Women Lawyers (AWL)
Children at Risk Network (CARNET)
Federation of Family Planning Association Malaysia (FFPAM)
Kidz Studio Sdn. Bhd.
Kiwanis Club of Taman Tun Dr. Ismail
Malaysian Association of Kindergartens (PTM)
Malaysian Care
Malaysian Child Welfare Council (MKKM)
NCBR Coordinating Committee Malaysia (NCBRCC)
Peace Please Sdn. Bhd.
Pusat Majudiri Y (YMCA)
Sekolah Sri Garden
Selangor and Federal Territory Association for Retarded Children
Selangor Council of Welfare and Social Development
Women and Health Association of Kuala Lumpur (WAKE)
World Vision in Malaysia
Wanita Inovatif Jayadiri (WIJADI)



KENYATAAN BERSAMA
15 November 2002

Cadangan Hukuman Mati Mandatori terhadap Perogol Kanak-kanak bukan untuk kepentingan utama kanak-kanak

Pertubuhan bertandatangan di bawah yang terlibat dalam isu keganasan seksual, rogol, penderaan kanak-kanak, keganasan terhadap wanita dan hak asasi menyeru kerajaan untuk mempertimbangkan cadangan untuk hukuman mati mandatori terhadap perogol kanak-kanak.

Sungguhpun kami amat marah dan tergempar akan tindakan terkutuk perogol kanak-kanak, kami lebih memberi perhatian terhadap kebajikan mangsa yang membawa kepada pendirian kami. Kami mengiktiraf bahawa kerajaan bertanggungjawab untuk melindungi wanita dan kanak-kanak dari rogol lalu membawa perogol ke muka pengadilan. Namun, kami mempercayai bahawa hukuman mati tidak dapat menyelesaikan masalah kejadian rogol dan sumbang mahram yang tinggi, malah kemungkinan besar membawa kesan yang negatif bagi mangsa terutama dari aspek laporan dan sembuh dari trauma.

 

Hukuman mati mandatori mungkin merendahkan bilangan laporan mengenai kejadian rogol kanak-kanak.
Kebanyakan kejadian rogol dan penderaan seksual kanak-kanak tidak didedahkan. Ini disebabkan oleh dinamiknya, di mana kebanyakan masa perogol berada di kedudukan yang dipercayai dan berkuasa ke atas kanak-kanak tersebut. Pada tahun 2001, terdapat 161 kes rogol kanak-kanak yang dilaporkan, di mana 83% dilakukan oleh mereka yang dikenali (Rujukan: Statistik Polis DiRaja Malaysia, Bukit Aman). Ini termasuk adik-beradik, penjaga, ayah, ayah tiri, guru, jiran, keluarga angkat dan saudaranya.

Mangsa kanak-kanak tersebut kemudian diletakkan di kedudukan yang sukar kerana mempersoalkan kredibiliti seorang dewasa yang dipercayai. Dari pengalaman kami, bukanlah jarang untuk mendapati seorang penjaga kepada kanak-kanak tidak mempercayai kata-katanya. Memandangkan keadaan ini berlaku maka laporan mahupun siasatan ke atas kes rogol atau penderaan seksual menjadi suatu kekecualian dan bukan sebagai suatu norma. Pengetahuan tentang kejadian yang sedemikian adalah kerana timbulnya konflik keluarga atau penemuan secara kebetulan oleh pihak yang ketiga.

Disebabkan oleh hukuman mati yang akan dikenakan, ini akan terus mencegah mangsa kanak-kanak dan orang di sekelilingnya untuk membuat laporan. Perogol boleh menggunakan maklumat ini untuk mengugut atau memanipulasi kanak-kanak untuk berdiam diri. Pemindahan beban kepada kanak-kanak supaya ia bertanggungjawab terhadap kemungkinan kematian seseorang yang berada dalam kedudukan yang dipercayai sesungguhnya tidak adil dan membantut proses pemulihannya dengan trauma yang berterusan. Penyelidikan menunjukkan bahawa jika mangsa kanak-kanak menyedari bahawa pelakunya akan dijatuhkan hukuman mati, kesan ke atasnya adalah amat mengerikan. Ditambah dengan perasaan salahkan diri serta serba salah yang akan dialami oleh kanak-kanak tersebut, ternyata beban emosi terletak pada kanak-kanak sama ada untuk melaporkan atau untuk pulih dari rogol.

Kanak-kanak tersebut kemudian akan terpaksa untuk terus tinggal dalam situasi yang bahaya tanpa sebarang jalan penyelesaian. Seterusnya, lebih perogol kanak-kanak akan meneruskan tindakan terkutuk mereka tanpa takut untuk dihukum.

Hukuman mati terhadap jenayah rogol kanak-kanak adalah tidak produktif dan tidak membawa kepada keadilan yang sebenar kepada mangsa kanak-kanak.

 

Masalah Hukuman dan Keperluan untuk Sokongan
Menurut penyelidikan mengenai rogol yang dijalankan oleh All Women's Action Society (AWAM) pada 1999, hanya 20% kes rogol yang dilaporkan didakwa di mahkamah di sekitar Wilayah Persekutuan, di mana hanya separuh daripada kes yang didakwa dijatuhkan hukuman. Terdapat banyak rintangan terhadap penjatuhan hukuman termasuk keperluan bukti kecederaan fizikal untuk menyokong keterangan dan proses perbicaraan panjang yang kurang prihatin terhadap kepentingan mangsa. Di samping itu, semakin berat sesuatu hukuman, semakin besarnya beban pembuktian diletakkan pada mangsa kanak-kanak dan pendakwaraya yang menyukarkan lagi kejadian rogol untuk dibuktikan. Ini bermakna peluang untuk penjatuhan hukuman adalah lebih tipis. Mitos di sekitar rogol dan kecenderungan untuk penyalahan terhadap mangsa kanak-kanak juga membawa kepada kesukaran untuk membuat laporan.

Selain daripada memberi perhatian kepada hukuman yang lebih berat, isu-isu ini perlu diselesaikan untuk mewujudkan suatu persekitaran yang selamat untuk mangsa rogol untuk mendedahkan kejadian dan memastikan penjatuhan hukuman ke atas perogol dan proses keadilan jenayah yang tidak traumatik, cepat dan efektif. Malaysia telah meratifikasikan Konvensi Hak Kanak-kanak pada tahun 1995, di mana dinyatakan bahawa tindakan yang diambil untuk tujuan kehidupan, perkembangan, perlindungan dan penyertaan seorang kanak-kanak, perlu mengambil kira kepentingan utama kanak-kanak tersebut. Tindakbalas ke atas isu ini menerusi hukuman yang berat tidak bergerak ke arah kepentingan kanak-kanak tersebut.

 

Hukuman mati mandatori melanggar hak asasi untuk hidup
Hukuman mati merupakan pelanggaran yang paling utama hak asasi manusia untuk hidup dan hak untuk tidak tertakluk kepada layanan yang kejam, tidak berperikemanusian mahupun penghinaan, sepertimana diperuntukkan di Deklarasi Sedunia Hak Manusia. Ini mempertahankan budaya keganasan dan tidak menyelesaikan faktor asas rogol kanak-kanak dan keganasan terhadap wanita dan gadis. Di samping itu, penyelidikan sedunia menunjukkan bahawa hukuman mati lebih cenderung dilaksanakan terhadap mereka yang lebih miskin dan kurang pendidikan atau yang kurang kesempatan untuk membela diri. Hukuman mati tidak dapat ditarik balik di mahkamah, malah wujud kemungkinan di mana keadilan tidak akan dicapai bagi jenayah tersabit.

Tiada bukti kukuh yang menunjukkan bahawa hukuman mati adalah lebih deteren daripada bentuk hukuman yang lain. Pembunuhan dan perniagaan dadah masih merupakan masalah yang signifikan di Malaysia walaupun hukuman mati mandatori digunakan ke atas kedua-dua jenayah ini. Hukuman mati ini adalah berdasarkan kepada perasaan membalas dendam dan kemarahan. Dalam konteks kes rogol kanak-kanak, hukuman mati tidak mempengaruhi keadilan untuk masyarakat ataupun kanak-kanak.

Kami menyeru kerajaan untuk benar-benar mempertimbangkan hukuman mati sebagai penyelesaian yang berkesan terhadap rogol kanak-kanak, tetapi memberi perhatian pada menyediakan keadilan yang benar terhadap mangsa dengan memastikan pendakwaan yang efektif yang membawa kepada penjatuhan hukuman ke atas pelaku. Ini akan membawa kepada penyediaan perkhidmatan sokongan yang dapat memfasilitasikan laporan oleh kanak-kanak, penyiasatan yang efisien dan pengumpulan bukti serta pendakwaan yang efektif dan semerta dapat memastikan perkhidmatan sokongan yang lebih baik untuk mangsa pulih dari trauma.

 

Mangsa rogol kanak-kanak patut mendapatkan keadilan dan perlindungan yang sahih; hukuman mati bukan penyelesaian.

Disediakan oleh Jaclyn Kee, Pertubuhan Pertolongan Wanita (WAO), diendors oleh:
Sisters In Islam (SIS)
International Women's Rights Watch - Asia Pacific (IWRAW AP)
Protect and Save The Children Association of Selangor and Kuala Lumpur (PS The Children)
Women's Centre for Change (WCC)
Women's Development Collective (WDC)
Women's Candidacy Initiative (WCI)
Suara Rakyat Malaysia (SUARAM)
National Human Rights Society (HAKAM)
Amnesty International in Malaysia (AI)
All Women's Action Society (AWAM)
Asiaworks Foundation
Association of Registered Child Care Providers Malaysia (PPBM)
Association of Women Lawyers (AWL)
Children at Risk Network (CARNET)
Federation of Family Planning Association Malaysia (FFPAM)
Kidz Studio Sdn. Bhd.
Kiwanis Club of Taman Tun Dr. Ismail
Malaysian Association of Kindergartens (PTM)
Malaysian Care
Malaysian Child Welfare Council (MKKM)
NCBR Coordinating Committee Malaysia (NCBRCC)
Peace Please Sdn. Bhd.
Pusat Majudiri Y (YMCA)
Sekolah Sri Garden
Selangor and Federal Territory Association for Retarded Children
Selangor Council of Welfare and Social Development
Women and Health Association of Kuala Lumpur (WAKE)
World Vision in Malaysia
Wanita Inovatif Jayadiri (WIJADI)



«  Back